Collaborations abound as data collection continues

Baseline monitoring is now complete! Collaborators across over 30 organizations collected, processed, and analyzed data - partnerships have been key to success. Researchers have completed data collection and their final technical reports. Check out the project pages to read the reports and explore data.

The baseline program was the first step in MPA monitoring. It established a baseline – or benchmark – of ecological and socioeconomic conditions when the regional MPA network took effect and documented any initial socioeconomic and ecological changes in the region in the first few years following MPA implementation. 

 

A COMPREHENSIVE SNAPSHOT OF THE REGION

Following implementation of the MPA network, the California Ocean Protection Council allocated $4-million to fund baseline monitoring inside and outside of MPAs in the region. 

The baseline program management team composed of the Ocean Science Trust, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ocean Protection Council, and Sea Grant congruently oversaw the program. 

This team recognized the distinct culture of the North Coast, and welcomed the opportunity to establish lasting relationships with the local community, including tribal governments, resource managers, local experts and scientists – as we collectively work toward a healthy and resilient marine environment.

 

SELECTING BASELINE PROJECTS

A Request for Proposals (RFP) was released in April 2013. The RFP was developed through a collaboration among the baseline program management team, North Coast Community Liaisons, North Coast tribes, and North Coast community. Through an independent peer review process administered by California Sea Grant, 11 proposals were awarded funding. (See 'Collecting Data' tab for more information on these projects.)

 

PARTNERING WITH THE LOCAL COMMUNITY

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning for long-term monitoring began in 2016 – building on the knowledge and experience developed during baseline monitoring.

 

TAKING THE PULSE OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS

Long-term monitoring answers two key questions:

  1. What is the condition or ‘health’ of California’s marine ecosystems, inside and outside MPAs?

  2. How are MPA design and management decisions helping to achieve the marine life protection goals of the MLPA?

These questions are at the heart of the MPA monitoring framework, which has been adopted by the state and forms the foundation of each regional MPA monitoring plan. By applying this framework, California can ensure that monitoring will assess progress toward the MLPA goals and allow cross-regional comparisons.

 

MEASURING PROGRESS TOWARD MPA NETWORK GOALS

It’s essential that long-term monitoring reflects local priorities, is responsive to management needs, and incorporates rigorous science.

Draft monitoring metrics were developed with the North Coast community to inform baseline monitoring. A Statewide MPA Monitoring Action Plan is anticipated for release in 2018.

Find out how these provide a starting point for developing a long-term monitoring plan.